ABCG CGI Climate Change Response Survey, Kilombero Valley, Tanzania

Summary of the ABCG Global Change Imapact thematic area climate change response survey, carried out in Kilombero Valley, Tanzania in 2017. 

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Human Response to Climate Change: Interview Data

Database of key informant and focus group interviews.

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Human adaptation strategies to Climate Change – Literarure review

Database on the analysis of peer-reviewed and grey literature on research and anecdotal evidence of unplanned responses to climate change.

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Meeting Report: Using Marxan as a tool to make scientifically sound decisions considering trade-offs involving conservation actions and development under climate change–A Case Study from the Kilimanjaro Ecosystem, Kenya/Tanzania

ABCG members, African Wildlife Foundation, Jane Goodall Institute and the Wildlife Conservation Society worked together to develop and trial a decision framework that allows planners to integrate the objectives of climate change mitigation, climate change adaptation, biodiversity conservation, and economic development into landscape level planning. The objective was to help identify and prioritize areas that will achieve both conservation and mitigation gains, to maximize return on limited conservation and REDD+ resources, while also minimizing the opportunity cost of conservation. The project is predicated on the notion that by getting the right stakeholders in the room and then providing them with better access to data and a methodology to integrate that data into the decision making process, more informed decisions can be made about future land-use in each the landscapes.

The aim of this report is to provide a summary of the two-day meeting. The meeting was well attended with members of USAID, Birdlife, Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS), Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute (TAWIRI), Tanzania Ministry of Energy and Minerals, School of Field Studies, and the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI).

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Meeting Report: Using Marxan as a tool to make scientifically sound decisions considering trade-offs involving conservation actions and development under climate change–A Case Study from the Greater Mahale Ecosystem, Tanzania

The Jane Goodall Institute (JGI) with technical support from the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) held a two day workshop at the JGI’s Education Center in Kigoma on 23-24th of May 2013 to expose conservation managers, planners, members of the development community and government to these relatively new tools and how they can be used to make better decisions for all concerned. The team aimed to do this through analyzing a case study of the trade-offs between biodiversity conservation, carbon sequestration and development in the Greater Mahale Ecosystem in western Tanzania.

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A Systematic Approach to Incorporate the Human Response into Climate Change Conservation Planning – summary report

For the past three years ABCG members Conservation International, The Nature Conservancy, Wildlife Conservation Society, and World Wildlife Fund have collaborated to bridge existing knowledge gaps in adaption. Building on the work conducted by the group in recent years where activities highlighted the central role that human livelihoods played in the conservation adaptation work that all member organizations were engaged in, the activities in 2013 focused on the integration of the human response to climate change into conservation vulnerability assessments. Conservation vulnerability assessments often focus only on the direct impact of climate change on biodiversity (e.g. range shift in response to higher temperatures or altered rainfall regimes). This narrow focus means that we may only be partially accounting for the true impact of climate change. Human populations are also responding to climate change and will continue to respond to reduce their vulnerability and take advantage of new opportunities that climate change creates. The impact these changes in human behavior have on biodiversity are the “indirect impacts” of climate change, and understanding them is essential to identifying effective and appropriate conservation interventions. The goal of the work is to mainstream the incorporation of the human response to climate change into conservation climate adaptation planning through worked examples.

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Climate Change in the Western Indian Ocean: A Situation Assessment and Policy Considerations – full report

Led by a WCS consultant, the document assesses climate change in the Western Indian Ocean and summarizes regional, national and WIO-C member interventions in the field of climate change adaptation. The report undertakes to review existing national and regional climate change strategies prepared by countries; review existing climate change strategies and plans of the WIO-C members; prepare an inventory of ongoing national and regional Climate Change programs in the region; identifying important gaps in regional climate change programs.

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Building Resilience in Western Tanzania: Helping human and natural communities adapt to climate change and improve their health – slide presentation

Western Tanzania has a population, health and environment project that proves to be a valuable lesson in holistic climate change (CC) adaptation action. Kristen Patterson of The Nature Conservancy stressed the importance of undergirding EBA/CBA programs with sound science in her presentation. This involves a two-pronged vulnerability assessment including climate impacts and robustness of CC adaptation strategies that stress local governance functionality.

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Climate Change in Western Tanzania: Helping People and Nature Adapt to Climate Change – report brief

A report brief on climate change adaptation strategies identified through a participatory process convened by The Nature Conservancy involving the Jane Goodall Institute, the Frankfurt Zoological Society, the Tanzania National Parks (TANAPA), and Kigoma and Mpanda District officials to establish effective climate adaptation strategies and actions. This process was based on the premise that the most effective way to combat climate impacts is to empower local communities to sustainably manage their own natural resources.

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